Archaeologists recently discovered ancient Maya structures hidden beneath the Yucatan jungle

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More than 1,500 years ago, two sets of residential buildings were constructed in the jungle in Mexico.

Since then, archaeologists have worked to find the buildings to no avail — until now. Experts recently discovered the two structures hidden beneath layers of jungle foliage and growth, according to a Sept. 7 news release from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History.

One of the buildings found in the group during the restoration.
One of the buildings found in the group during the restoration.

The homes were discovered at the Kabah Archaeological Zone in Yucatán, which is in southeast Mexico. Archaeologists said they were built sometime between 250 A.D. and 500 A.D.

A close-up view of the home during restoration work.
A close-up view of the home during restoration work.

Experts noted that one of the homes stood out from the others for its palace-like appearance, according to the institute. The home included an approximately 85-foot extension with a portico decorated with nine openings and eight pilasters — which are shallow columns built against a wall, according to Britannica.

Experts said the building had intricate carvings and designs.
Experts said the building had intricate carvings and designs.

The intricately decorated home included carvings depicting motifs of feathers, birds, and beads, archaeologists said. The staircase displayed vestiges of a stucco figurehead extending up to nearly 30 feet in length.

Archaeologists also discovered ceramic remains including polychrome bowls and utilitarian vessels at the site, they said.

Source: news release from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History.

The Yucatan Post