“For Korean society I am a failure,” says the influencer Chingu amiga, who succeeded in Mexico

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Chingu amiga currently has more than six million followers on YouTube and more than 7 on Instagram and TikTok. However, she recognized that for the customs of her society, the decisions she made towards this occupation were not worthy of applause.

After having suffered from burnout syndrome (chronic work stress) due to the level of demands she had in her country of origin, South Korea, the influencer Sujin Kim, better known as Chingu amiga, managed to succeed in Mexico in less than five years.

The youtuber attended Yordi Rosado’s interview program where she spoke in detail about her path to the video platform and social networks where she is now a phenomenon for sharing content about her adaptation process in Mexico.

Chingu amiga currently has more than six million followers on YouTube and more than 7 on Instagram and TikTok. She, however, recognized that for the customs of her society, which is the 14th largest economy in the world, the decisions she made towards this occupation were not worthy of applause.

“For Korean society, I am a failure,” said Sujin Kim. “Because I didn’t join a good company, I’m thirty years old and I haven’t married, all my friends when I came back said poor thing,” she recounted.

The 31-year-old also accepted that at first her mother was ashamed to accept that she had come to Mexico in search of a better life, since in Korea having been mentally affected reduced her opportunities.

“Every night I cried without knowing why I was sad, like I already wanted to die, but I didn’t know why I felt that way, like life already wanted me to be taken away, I couldn’t sleep crying waiting for it to be the last day” , deepened her feelings before being treated for a year in a hospital.

The first video she uploaded to the video platform was two years ago, while she was a translator and teacher at a school where they taught Korean.

During the time that she spoke with the interviewer, some confessions that she made about customs in her culture were surprising, such as that they do not have any type of physical contact even in the family nucleus and that they beat her in elementary school.

“The teachers hit me a lot, who was the English teacher, she would hit me with a shovel for each word that I made a mistake, with a large board,” she pointed out. “I was also slapped once with a book because I had long hair and my friend slapped me with a shoe because I left school at 6 but he had to be there until 11,” she recounted.

Everything changed when she, at the age of 22, was sent, like several of her friends, to another country so that she could practice her English. In Canada she got to know another culture and since then adapting to her country again has been very difficult.

In Mexico, she initially worked in some Korean companies, although she remembers that she suffered bullying.

“The men bet on who was going to sleep with me first and they sent me underwear on my birthday and called me Foro tomato with it,” she recalled.

Today she is one of the most recognized Korean influencers, she has a loving relationship with a Mexican and to officially welcome her to Mexico, the interwiewer gave her a replica of a Mexican passport, which she received with emotion.

Source: El Universal