Mexico and the US agree to re-install Trump-era ‘Remain-in-Mexico’ policy

1227
FILE PHOTO: Migrants, most of them asylum seekers sent back to Mexico from the U.S. under the "Remain in Mexico" program officially named Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), occupy a makeshift encampment in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico, October 28, 2019. REUTERS/Loren Elliott/File Photo

The Biden administration announced Thursday that it is ready to re-implement the Trump-era “Remain-in-Mexico” policy in response to a court order to do so, after making changes to to secure the agreement of the Mexican government – while still seeking to abolish the program entirely.

“As required by a federal court order, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has been working in good faith to re-implement the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP) program,” the Department of Homeland Security said in a statement. “Today, in coordination with the Departments of State and Justice, DHS announced key changes to MPP to address humanitarian concerns raised by the Government of Mexico and shared by the U.S. Government.”

SAN LUIS, AZ - AUGUST 15: Migrants attempting to cross in to the U.S. from Mexico are detained by U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the border August 15, 2021 in San Luis, Arizona. <span class="copyright">Photo by Nick Ut/Getty Images</span>
SAN LUIS, AZ – AUGUST 15: Migrants attempting to cross in to the U.S. from Mexico are detained by U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the border August 15, 2021 in San Luis, Arizona. Photo by Nick Ut/Getty Images

The Biden administration had abolished the program, known officially as the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), earlier this year. The program, set up and expanded in 2019, kept migrants in Mexico while migrants awaited their hearings rather than being released into the U.S. interior. It saw the construction of court tents along the southern border which migrants would enter for their proceedings.

The Trump administration hailed it as a key cog in its efforts to end “catch-and-release” and stem the flow of migrants that had surged into the U.S. that year. Opponents have said the policy was cruel and puts migrants at risk of violence and exploitation in Mexico. The Biden administration began unraveling the program shortly after entering office, and shut it down entirely in June.

But a federal court order, upheld by the Supreme Court, ordered the Biden administration to re-implement the program after Missouri and Texas argued that the policy had not been rescinded lawfully.

Source: El Universal

Mexico Daily Post