Lies and truths of the Conquest of Mexico

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The Conquest of Mexico was one of the most decisive events in the reconstitution of the world of the 16th century and, without a doubt, one of the most approached by historians, true or imaginary, for five centuries.

Friday, August 13, will be 500 years since the surrender of Cuauhtémoc, emperor of the Aztecs, before Hernán Cortés, the captain of the Spanish army who, accompanied by thousands of indigenous adversaries of the Mexica, had ended the final resistance of Mexico-Tenochtitlan. A storm was coming over the Anahuac Valley and behind the western mountains, the Fifth Sun of the original town of Aztlán was forever hidden.

Thus culminated the historical episode known as the Conquest of Mexico, started in fact with the arrival in 1492 of Christopher Columbus to what those who called themselves discoverers called the West Indies and which began its final stage with the landing of Cortés and his troops in the coasts of Quintana Roo. 

The Conquest of Mexico was one of the most decisive events in the reconstitution of the world of the 16th century and, without a doubt, one of the most approached by historians, true or imaginary, for five centuries.

In its special edition dedicated to the commemoration of the 500 Years of the Conquest of Mexico, which will be available to the public from August 1, Proceso collects stories, testimonies, documents, images and analysis of experts in the field that, in as a whole, they offer a wide range of what really happened, what could have happened, the myths, inventions and lies that have fed Western historiography and, of course, also the indigenous imagination.

Underlying the subconscious of Mexican culture is a mixture of half-truths, an explanation that is not the only but sufficient explanation of the profound differences and injustices that have characterized our society.  

Source: proceso.com.mx

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